Welcome to MVP-Soft, your premier provider of software architecture services.

At MVP-Soft, we understand the importance of having a solid software architecture in order to build scalable, maintainable and high-performance systems. That’s why we specialize in providing software architecture services that help organizations design and implement systems that meet their specific business needs.

Our team of experienced software architects have a wealth of knowledge and expertise in various technologies and architecture patterns such as microservices, event-driven architecture, cloud-native, and more. This allows us to create systems that are efficient, scalable, and easy to maintain.

We provide a range of software architecture services, including:

  • Software architecture design and review
  • Microservices architecture
  • Cloud-native architecture
  • Event-driven architecture
  • Performance tuning and optimization

We work closely with our clients to understand their specific business requirements and provide tailored solutions. Our team will design and implement systems that are efficient, scalable, and easy to maintain, and that can meet the demands of their business.

We also provide services for legacy system modernization, which can help organizations to improve the performance and scalability of their existing systems.

At MVP-Soft, we are committed to delivering high-quality work on time and within budget. We believe that open communication is key to a successful project, and we will keep you informed every step of the way.

If you’re ready to take your business to the next level with our software architecture services, contact us today to schedule a free consultation. We look forward to working with you!

In further reading you can find out more about how we work, what are our practices and some pointers on ASW and Azure environments.

Our approach

Best practices that we follow in our company for software architecture are:

  1. Keep it simple: Avoid over-engineering solutions and strive for simplicity in design.
  2. Separation of concerns: Break down the system into smaller, independent components that each have a single, well-defined responsibility.
  3. Loose coupling: Ensure that the components of the system are as independent as possible, so that changes to one component have minimal impact on the others.
  4. High cohesion: Ensure that the components of the system are highly cohesive, meaning that their functionality is tightly related and focused on a specific task.
  5. Modularity: Design the system to be modular, so that new features can be added or existing ones can be replaced without having to make changes to the entire system.
  6. Scalability: Anticipate and plan for growth by designing the system to be scalable and able to handle increasing amounts of data and traffic.
  7. Testability: Make the system easy to test by designing it in a way that allows for automated testing and by breaking down the system into small, testable units.
  8. Extensibility: Make it easy to add new features or extend the system in the future by designing it in a way that allows for flexibility and extensibility.

Keep it simple

Keeping it simple, also known as the “KISS principle” (Keep It Simple, Stupid), is a design principle that emphasizes simplicity and minimalism in software design. The idea is that simple systems are easier to understand, maintain, and evolve over time.

Here are a few ways to keep a software design simple:

  1. Avoid unnecessary complexity: Only include features and functionality that are truly necessary for the system to perform its intended task.
  2. Use familiar patterns and technologies: Leverage proven patterns and technologies that are widely used and well-understood in the industry.
  3. Keep the code clean and readable: Write clear, concise, and well-organized code that is easy to understand and maintain.
  4. Minimize dependencies: Keep the number of dependencies to a minimum to reduce complexity and improve maintainability.
  5. Avoid over-engineering: Don’t try to anticipate every possible future use case or requirement.
  6. Don’t reinvent the wheel: Use existing libraries and frameworks when possible, instead of writing custom code from scratch.
  7. Prioritize simplicity over performance: A simple, easy-to-maintain system is more important than one that is optimized for performance but is difficult to understand and maintain.

By following the KISS principle, you can create systems that are robust, scalable, and easy to maintain and evolve over time, which will save time and money in the long run.

Separation of concerns

Separation of concerns is a software design principle that states that a software system should be broken down into smaller, independent components, each with a single, well-defined responsibility.

Here are a few ways to implement separation of concerns in a software design:

  1. Modularity: Break the system down into smaller, self-contained modules that can be developed, tested, and maintained independently.
  2. Single Responsibility Principle: Each module or component should have a single, well-defined responsibility, and should not be affected by changes to other parts of the system.
  3. Abstraction: Use abstraction to separate the implementation details of a component from its interface, making it easier to change the implementation without affecting the rest of the system.
  4. Encapsulation: Hide the implementation details of a component behind an interface, making it easy to change the implementation without affecting the rest of the system.
  5. Loose coupling: Minimize the dependencies between components, so that changes to one component have minimal impact on the others.

By following these principles of separation of concerns, you can create a system that is more robust, maintainable, and scalable, because the change in one component will not affect the entire system, and the system will be more understandable, and easy to test.

It also makes it easier to change or add new features, as the developers can focus on one specific part of the system, instead of worrying about the entire system.

Loose coupling

Loose coupling is a software design principle that states that the components of a system should be as independent as possible, so that changes to one component have minimal impact on the others.

Here are a few ways to implement loose coupling in a software design:

  1. Interfaces: Use interfaces to define the contract between components, rather than relying on concrete implementations. This allows different components to be swapped in and out without affecting the rest of the system.
  2. Dependency injection: Use dependency injection to provide components with their dependencies, rather than hard-coding them. This allows different implementations of a dependency to be easily swapped in and out without affecting the rest of the system.
  3. Event-driven architecture: Use an event-driven architecture to decouple components by allowing them to communicate through messages or events, rather than direct method calls.
  4. Minimize shared state: Avoid sharing state between components, as this can lead to tight coupling and make it difficult to change or test the system.
  5. Avoid global variables: Avoid using global variables, as they can make it difficult to understand how a system works and make it harder to change or test.
  6. Avoid circular dependencies: Circular dependencies between components can lead to tight coupling and make it difficult to change or test the system.

By following these principles of loose coupling, you can create a system that is more robust, maintainable, and scalable, because the change in one component will not affect the entire system, and the system will be more understandable, and easy to test.

High cohesion

High cohesion is a software design principle that states that the components of a system should be highly cohesive, meaning that their functionality is tightly related and focused on a specific task. High cohesion is the opposite of low cohesion, where a component has many responsibilities or performs unrelated tasks.

Here are a few ways to implement high cohesion in a software design:

  1. Single Responsibility Principle: Each module or component should have a single, well-defined responsibility, and should not be affected by changes to other parts of the system.
  2. Group related functionality: Group functionality that is closely related or that works together towards a common goal.
  3. Minimize the number of inputs and outputs: Minimize the number of inputs and outputs of a component, as it will make it easier to understand and maintain.
  4. Avoid duplicated code: Avoid duplicated code by encapsulating common functionality in a single component.
  5. Keep the component small: Keep the component small and focused, as it will make it easier to understand and maintain.

By following these principles of high cohesion, you can create a system that is more robust, maintainable, and testable. High cohesion makes the code more readable, understandable and predictable, which makes it easier to find and fix bugs, and to add new features. Additionally, components with high cohesion are less likely to affect other parts of the system when changes are made, which makes the system more robust.

Modularity

Modularity is a software design principle that states that a software system should be organized into small, self-contained modules or components that can be developed, tested, and maintained independently.

Here are a few ways to implement modularity in a software design:

  1. Encapsulation: Encapsulate the implementation details of a module, exposing only the necessary interface to the outside world. This allows the implementation of a module to be changed without affecting the rest of the system.
  2. Interfaces: Use interfaces to define the contract between modules, rather than relying on concrete implementations. This allows different modules to be swapped in and out without affecting the rest of the system.
  3. Abstraction: Use abstraction to separate the implementation details of a module from its interface, making it easier to change the implementation without affecting the rest of the system.
  4. Reusability: Design modules to be reusable, so that they can be used in multiple parts of the system, or even in other systems.
  5. Loose coupling: Minimize the dependencies between modules, so that changes to one module have minimal impact on the others.
  6. High cohesion: Make sure that each module has a single, well-defined responsibility, and that the functionality within the module is tightly related and focused on a specific task.

By following these principles of modularity, you can create a system that is more robust, maintainable, and scalable, as the system will be divided into smaller, independent components that can be developed, tested and maintained independently. Additionally, it makes it easier to add new features, or replace existing ones, without having to make changes to the entire system.

Scalability

Scalability refers to a system’s ability to handle increasing amounts of work or load as the demand for the system grows. A scalable system is able to maintain its performance, even as the number of users or the amount of data processed by the system increases.

There are several ways to design for scalability:

  1. Horizontal scaling: This involves adding more machines to a system to handle an increase in traffic or load.
  2. Vertical scaling: This involves adding more resources, such as memory or processing power, to a single machine to handle an increase in traffic or load.
  3. Caching: Storing frequently accessed data in a fast, in-memory cache can greatly improve the performance of a system by reducing the number of times the system has to retrieve data from a slower, disk-based storage system.
  4. Load balancing: distributing incoming requests across multiple machines to ensure that no single machine is overwhelmed.
  5. Asynchronous processing: Using asynchronous processing to handle tasks that don’t need to be completed in real-time can help to prevent a system from becoming bogged down with too many requests.
  6. Microservices: breaking down a monolithic application into smaller, more manageable services, each with its own scalability characteristics.
  7. Cloud Computing: using cloud-based resources, such as virtual machines or containers, can make it easy to scale a system up or down as needed.

Scalability is an ongoing effort and requires continuous monitoring, testing and fine-tuning to ensure that the system can handle the increasing traffic and load, while maintaining a high level of performance and availability.

Testability

Testability is the degree to which a software system can be tested to ensure that it behaves correctly. A testable system is one that is designed in a way that makes it easy to write automated tests, and to validate that the system behaves as expected.

Here are a few ways to design for testability:

  1. Separation of concerns: Break down the system into smaller, independent components that each have a single, well-defined responsibility. This makes it easier to test individual components in isolation.
  2. Loose coupling: Ensure that the components of the system are as independent as possible, so that changes to one component have minimal impact on the others. This makes it easier to test individual components in isolation.
  3. High cohesion: Ensure that the components of the system are highly cohesive, meaning that their functionality is tightly related and focused on a specific task. This makes it easier to understand what a component is supposed to do and therefore test it.
  4. Modularity: Design the system to be modular, so that new features can be added or existing ones can be replaced without having to make changes to the entire system. This makes it easier to test individual components in isolation.
  5. Single Responsibility Principle: Each module or component should have a single, well-defined responsibility, and should not be affected by changes to other parts of the system.
  6. Abstraction: Use abstraction to separate the implementation details of a component from its interface, making it easier to change the implementation without affecting the rest of the system and test it.
  7. Dependency injection: Use dependency injection to provide components with their dependencies, rather than hard-coding them. This allows different implementations of a dependency to be easily swapped in and out without affecting the rest of the system, making it easier to test.

Testability is an important aspect of software development, as automated tests can catch bugs and regression early in the development process and prevent them from being shipped to production.

Extensibility

Extensibility is a software design principle that states that a system should be designed in a way that makes it easy to add new features or extend the system in the future.

Here are a few ways to design for extensibility:

  1. Modularity: Design the system to be modular, so that new features can be added or existing ones can be replaced without having to make changes to the entire system.
  2. Loose coupling: Ensure that the components of the system are as independent as possible, so that changes to one component have minimal impact on the others. This makes it easier to add new features without affecting the existing functionality.
  3. Plug-in architecture: Allow for third-party developers to create plug-ins or extensions that can be easily integrated into the system.
  4. Separation of concerns: Break down the system into smaller, independent components that each have a single, well-defined responsibility. This makes it easier to add new features without affecting the existing functionality.
  5. Use of patterns: use design patterns that are known to be extensible such as the strategy pattern, observer pattern, etc.
  6. Event-driven architecture: Use an event-driven architecture to decouple components by allowing them to communicate through messages or events, rather than direct method calls. This allows new features to be added without affecting the existing functionality.
  7. Open-closed principle: design the system in a way that new functionality can be added without modifying existing code.

By following these principles of extensibility, you can create a system that is flexible and can evolve over time to meet the changing needs of the business or the users, without requiring major changes to the existing system.

Quick overview of two most popular platforms on the market now.

Scalable architecture for Software Application on AWS

There are several best practices that you can follow when designing a scalable
architecture for a Software Application on Amazon Web Services (AWS). Here are
a few key considerations:

  1. Use Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances or AWS Lambda
    functions for your computer resources. These services allow you to easily scale
    your application up or down based on demand.
  2. Use Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) or Amazon Simple Storage Service
    (S3) for your storage needs. Both of these services are designed for durability and
    high availability, and can easily scale to meet the needs of your application.
  3. Use Amazon Elastic Load Balancer (ELB) to distribute incoming traffic
    across multiple compute resources. This helps to ensure that your application can
    handle sudden increases in traffic without experiencing downtime.
  4. Use Amazon CloudWatch to monitor the performance and health of your
    application. This service provides real-time visibility into resource usage and can
    help you identify and resolve issues before they impact your users.
  5. Use Amazon Route 53 for domain name system (DNS) management. This
    service provides a scalable and highly available DNS infrastructure that can help
    ensure that your application is always available to your users.
  6. Use Amazon CloudFormation or AWS Elastic Beanstalk to automate the
    deployment and management of your application. These services allow you to
    easily replicate your application stack in multiple regions and environments,
    making it easier to scale and maintain your application over time.

Scalable architecture for Software Application on Azure

There are several best practices that you can follow when designing a scalable
architecture for a Software Application on Microsoft Azure. Here are a few key
considerations:

  1. Use Azure Virtual Machines (VMs) or Azure Functions for your computer
    resources. These services allow you to easily scale your application up or down
    based on demand.
  2. Use Azure Storage for your storage needs. This service provides a range of
    options including Azure Blob Storage for unstructured data, Azure Table Storage
    for structured NoSQL data, and Azure Queue Storage for message queuing. All of
    these options are designed for durability and high availability, and can easily scale
    to meet the needs of your application.
  3. Use Azure Load Balancer to distribute incoming traffic across multiple
    compute resources. This helps to ensure that your application can handle sudden
    increases in traffic without experiencing downtime.
  4. Use Azure Monitor to monitor the performance and health of your
    application. This service provides real-time visibility into resource usage and can
    help you identify and resolve issues before they impact your users.
  5. Use Azure DNS for domain name system (DNS) management. This service
    provides a scalable and highly available DNS infrastructure that can help ensure
    that your application is always available to your users.
  6. Use Azure Resource Manager or Azure DevOps to automate the deployment
    and management of your application. These tools allow you to easily replicate your
    application stack in multiple regions and environments, making it easier to scale
    and maintain your application over time.